Genetic Testing

Genetic Testing

Genetic testing looks for changes, sometimes called mutations or variants, in your DNA. Genetic testing is helpful in many areas of medicine and can change the medical care you or your family member receives. For example, genetic testing can diagnose a genetic condition such as Fragile X or information about your risk of developing cancer. There are many different kinds of genetic tests. Genetic tests are done using a blood or spit sample, and results are usually ready in a few weeks. Because we share DNA with our family members, your family members may have the exact change if you have a genetic modification. According to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2018, nearly 81,500 babies were born due to assisted reproductive technology (ART). One of these technologies is in vitro fertilization (IVF), a method in which the woman’s eggs are harvested, fertilized in a laboratory, and then one or more embryos are transferred into her uterus. While this sounds straightforward, the heart-breaking truth is that only about four in 10 embryo transfers result in the birth of a baby.

Reasons for Genetic Testing
  • To learn whether you have a genetic condition that runs in your family before you have symptoms
  • To learn about the chance, a current or future pregnancy will have a genetic condition
  • To diagnose a genetic disorder if you or your child has symptoms
  • To understand and guide your cancer prevention or treatment plan

After learning more about genetic testing, you might decide it’s not right for you. Some reasons might be that it’s not relevant to you or won’t change your medical care, it’s too expensive, and the results may make you worried or anxious. However, genetic testing is an important procedure to consider before IVF treatment.